Dealing with excess Easter bounty

Is it just me, or do those jellybean eyebrows make this Easter Bunny look kind of mean?

Is it just me, or do those jellybean eyebrows make this Easter Bunny look kind of mean?

Coming back from Grandma and Grandpa’s Easter shindig Sunday night, I tried to get out of the car with an armload of leftover desserts and wound up dropping the fruit pizza all over the driveway.

“Good,” said Ben. “Now it will be that much easier to throw it away!”

My brother Brent and niece Kyla with her bag of goodies after the Easter Egg Hunt. (Luckily, hers wasn't as hard to find as some of the older kids, one of whom found hers in the corn field, covered with husks!)

My brother Brent and niece Kyla with her bag of goodies after the Easter Egg Hunt. (Luckily, hers wasn’t as hard to find as some of the older kids, one of whom found hers in the corn field, covered with husks!)

The kids and I were of a similar frame of mind: The Sunday splurge mindset – magnified by an unprecedented bounty that overcompensated for the ever-growing holiday guest list — MUST be confined to Sunday and should NOT, under any circumstances, be granted an opening to bleed over into Monday.

I used to feel helpless about this sort of thing. Leftover Grandma goodies were likely to be sampled later that same night, and the next day I’d work my way through whatever remained. It might take me several days to shift out of “feast” mode and get back to my usual (over)eating patterns.

These days I’ve got a pretty clear Monday dietary template I switch into, regardless of whatever occurred the day before. Overly yummy leftovers are mentally designated into an appropriate slot in the week. Grandma’s potato casserole became part of Monday’s dinner (though I abstained). The coconut bunny cake Colleen decorated went into the garage freezer, destined to re-emerge for some future Sunday dinner, which is about the only time in the week we plan to have dessert.

With the unfortunate accident that befell the fruit pizza, that left only the remnants of the Oreo “lasagna” Rowan made to take to her boyfriend’s family’s get-together, and Ben cleaned that up after Monday’s baseball practice.

One thing we didn’t do was visit the candy locker, which has been largely abandoned in recent months. The kids’ Easter baskets no longer contain much in the way of candy. As for the bounty from Sunday’s Easter Egg Hunt, Ben took most of his candy to school to share with friends, and the girls have gotten better about rationing theirs. I had a couple of Reese’s Peanut Butter Eggs as Saturday’s pre-run snack, and that seemed to do the trick.

My niece Monroe gets in a hand of Euchre in between kickball games and golf-cart Frisbee. It was a beautiful day, something we no longer take for granted after that harsh winter!

My niece Monroe gets in a hand of Euchre in between kickball games and golf-cart Frisbee. It was a beautiful day, something we no longer take for granted after that harsh winter!

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One Response to Dealing with excess Easter bounty

  1. I don’t like having a lot of candy and deserts around either. They are not that much of a temptation anymore, but I still prefer not to take the risk.
    We have a cupboard pretty full of “kids” candy, mostly that they got from family or birthday parties etc, and keeps adding up. Kids candy is not my favorite at all (think really sweet sugary stuff) so I don’t mind.
    Other things like cakes I bake, or good deserts we buy, I keep them for a couple days and then throw them out (they are perishable anyway and wouldn’t last that much longer). For things that don’t go bad as fast, like store bought cookies or quality dark chocolate (which I love) I buy the smaller packages.

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