Hoosier hysteria, the active woman’s girdle and other funeral notes

After last fall’s debate about whether runners and cyclists should stop for a funeral procession  – and my sister’s memory of how moved she was when a farmer stopped his tractor in the field — I couldn’t help watching for tractor salutes on the way to the cemetery yesterday.

My brothers and cousins carry Dan's casket at the cemetery on a gloriously sunny day that defied the forecasts.

My brothers and cousins carry Dan’s casket at the cemetery on a gloriously sunny day that defied the forecasts.

But despite the forecast-defying sunshine, the fields were too wet for any tractors to be out. Nor did we see any runners or cyclists on the winding drive through Rock Creek Township. But it was nice to see that every vehicle but one pulled to the side of the road, including several semis and a Fed Ex truck. I guess he figured his deliveries could wait.

– At the cemetery, retired News-Banner sports editor Joe Smekens was reviewing where Uncle Dan fit in the county basketball history timeline. He thought he remembered Dan playing on Norwell’s first basketball team in 1968, but that was Uncle Kent. Dan played for Lancaster and was in the final graduating class of 1967. It seems like I have a vague memory of Dan in his old green letter jacket, but I would’ve just been a toddler then. Maybe I just remember seeing it around Grandma and Grandpa Decker’s house.

– Last year at Grandma Annie Bananie’s funeral I wore compression shorts under my dress, in part because I thought I’d go for a run later that day but also because they work great at smoothing things out underneath. Apparently that started a trend, because as we were comparing notes after the funeral dinner, it turned out that five of us “ladies” were wearing either compression shorts, volleyball shorts or softball sliding shorts underneath our finery. (Naturally, my niece Monroe had to show hers off in front of everybody.)

– Finally, the Zanesville Community Church — liberally populated with Aunt Ellen’s Cayot relatives — put on one heck of a funeral dinner. The green beans looked and tasted like they were home-canned, and Ellen said afterward her aunt picked the berries for the raspberry pie.

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2 Responses to Hoosier hysteria, the active woman’s girdle and other funeral notes

  1. Thanks for sharing a family moment with us.

    • tischcaylor says:

      Yes, for better or worse, occasionally this blog turns into the family newsletter… but as I think you’ve noted on yours, sometimes it feels good to go a bit off topic. Thanks for understanding!

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